A fundraising plan changes your likelihood of success.   I can’t think of any big, successful nonprofit that got to where they are now without a plan.   Having a written fundraising plan moves you from being reactive to proactive which keeps you moving purposefully toward your goals.   A plan can keep you30

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Do your donors and prospects respond when you write to them? Or do you hear crickets?   Here’s the problem: Time.   Or rather, lack of time.   Being crunched for time is the enemy of fundraising.   We all are so busy that we don’t have the luxury of time to think. Time to30

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Your words matter.   Everything you say about your nonprofit is either pulling people in or pushing them away.   Doesn’t matter if we’re talking about marketing messages like newsletter articles or social media posts, or fundraising messages like appeals or thank-yous.   Sweet words draw people in like honey.   Boring words repel people30

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As humans, it’s our nature to watch those around us.   In fact, that’s where we get our cues for behavior and learn where we fit in the world.   Sometimes we feel intimidated by those we’re watching.   We might get jealous of their success or of what they have and we want it,30

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Fundraising has a rhythm:   People give. You thank them.   Then you move on to the next thing. Isn’t that how it’s done?   If so, it’s wrong.   Thanking isn’t the END of the process. It’s the BEGINNING.   Thanking someone is how you kick off the stewardship part of fundraising and start30

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  Overhead.   Ugh.   It’s the hardest thing to raise money for, right?   No one wants to pay for salaries. Or to keep the lights on in your building.   Or for the dozen or so other items that must be paid for to keep your nonprofit running.   You’ve probably looked for30

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