When I t each fundraising planning, step one is to identify your assets.

An asset is defined as a useful and desirable thing or quality. It can also be described as an item that can be converted into cash (real estate for example).

So what does this have to do with your nonprofit? As an organization, you have assets that you can leverage in your fundraising plan that can make your case for support stronger.

Here are some examples of nonprofit organizational assets:

  • Compelling mission (like feeding the hungry or housing the homeless)
  • Large donor base
  • Incredible organization name recognition (like Habitat for Humanity)
  • Well-known staff or Board members
  • Facility that lends itself well to a tour (like a clinic, shelter, or food pantry)
  • Organizational vehicles that are driven around town regularly
  • Website with LOTS of daily visitors
  • Opportunity for earned income (like a thrift store or gift shop)
  • Well-known local, regional, or national celebrity who supports your organization
  • Something else?Businesswoman With Question Marks

I helped a client evaluate their assets recently to find that they had a HUGE email list they weren’t doing anything with. They’d been taking names and email addresses for a couple of years, and sending out e-newsletters regularly, but had never asked for a gift. It was a no-brainer to me that we needed to ask! We did, and raised a quick $10,000 for the nonprofit.

Another organization I worked with had an awesome facility that lent itself really well to tours. They were able to create a tour that they promoted to their donors and prospects, and brought hundreds of people onsite over the course of a couple of years to see first-hand what their work was about. Most donors increased their giving after the tour experience.

So, what are your nonprofit organization’s assets?

Take a few minutes today (or better yet, at your next staff and/or Board meeting) to compile a list of assets that you can use help raise more money. Decide how you can leverage your assets, then get busy.

Those assets won’t do you any good unless you do something with them.



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